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Create a model of a neuron by using clay, playdough, styrofoam, recyclables, or anything else you can get your hands on. Then make it fire!

Create a model of a neuron by using clay, playdough, styrofoam, recyclables, or anything else you can get your hands on. Then make it fire!

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Meg commented on Feedforward and Opportunity Forum

Rich
Love the term "feedforward". I like the new integration of opportunity board and feedback forum. Bravo!
Meg

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Meg commented on Feedforward and Opportunity Forum

Richard
I think is SO cool to have a place to share challenges, and Google Sites seems like a good platform (easy to use and free). I have a couple of questions that I am thinking about. Is there really a difference between the Feedback Board and the Opportunity Board? I wonder if we could merge the two boards into one so there would be less decisions to make- where do I post? does this belong here? Then, how do we keep track of both a physical space and a digital space. Teachers need to consider- where do I post, which space gets the most traffic? are they cross-referenced? Jut thinking outloud here.
Meg

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Meg commented on The Blank Plan

Dominic

Great to see that your idea has moved on to the Evolve phase.

Here's an idea to launch "Blank Spaces" ( borrowed from educator, Thomas Maffai): on the first day of school start with a task that asks students to fill in a blank space (an unlined blank piece of paper). Ask them to close their eyes and listen carefully., and visualize the world. The entire world. Every city, country, continent. Every river, lake, ocean. Every mountain, peninsula, island. Ask them to create a detailed picture in their head. "What does the world look like to you?" Next the students open their eyes and start drawing what they see. Pencils should be moving for 10 minutes (vary time according to age) without stopping. Everything drawn should be labeled. Explain that there is no wrong answer.

This activity strikes be as powerful and disruptive. Students are used to googling anything they want to know. They are used to information instantly. This activity forces them to slow down and think. It forces them to pause. It forces them be okay with no knowing. It forces them to entertain blankness.

A couple of places to extend this idea:
1) Ask students to look at their map and think about what they want to know more about.
2) Ask students to compare their maps with a partner. Why might the maps be different?
3) Use this activity as a way to help students understand that taking risks and failure is part of learning.

Meg