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David commented on Step aside, Mr. Principal!

Ashley,
Thanks for your clarification question. No, I think my comment is not describing my idea, which is: the lead teachers are providing the PD to the classroom teachers on a daily basis. The lead teachers have already received an extensive dosage of PD. Now they are passing it on in their daily discourse with their colleagues, informing them of techniques and protocols, methods and other opportunities for growth.
Thanks,
David

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David commented on Step aside, Mr. Principal!

Ashley,
Thanks for your comment. It helps me to clarify how you have interpreted my idea. I'm am still hearing to many phrases that sound like administrative tasks. When you use the words "programs" and "testing data" you are moving into what I refer to administrative tasks.
The role I am talking about is one that remains in direct contact with teachers, more like a coach. Nearly all of the lead teacher's time should be spent observing, questioning, collaborating, and networking with on-site teachers. This role is not meant to be an extended arm of the principal. That administrator cannot ask the lead teacher to push his or her agenda or the latest mandate from the DO. The point here is "professional development" and that means helping classroom teachers with curriculum, lesson design, assessment, management and the myriad of other things that teachers need help with. If the lead teacher is meeting with the superintendent, or having meetings with other lead teachers, or is spending a good deal of time writing emails, then they are not working with other teachers, which is the real reason for the role.

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David commented on Step aside, Mr. Principal!

Mr. Principal,
I am impressed with your ability to manage teachers, programs, schedules, funding sources, state mandates, parents and other community members. The last thing you have time for might also be the most important job of all: teacher support and development. I realize that the best teacher for you might be one who never receives a parent or students complaint, who never writes a referral, and who occasionally is recognized by the local newspaper or foundation. But even if every single one of your staff possessed those characteristics, he or she might not be delivering the best curriculum for their students. Are your teachers actively engaging students with real world challenges that encourage their leadership, collaboration and intellectual growth? Are your teachers presenting units and modules that support your school's expected student learning results, the district's mission statement, and state and federal standards and practices? While the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mentality might satisfy some principals, I know that you want more for all of your students. You can't do it all. Let those staff members who are the experts at curriculum development, teacher support and collaboration help you make your job just a tiny bit easier, so you can be part of a school that has the profound, powerful effect on the community that can help change our world. Please support a 20% release period for your best teachers to help all of your teachers be their best!