Know Thyself

As teachers and parents, we need to help our students ascertain, track and manage their own learning by including them in progress meetings.

Photo of Chantelle Morrison
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Students are able to fully engage with their learning when they feel that they have locus of control over their own learning pathways. Having student progress meetings without the student present is 1) unethical and 2) nonsensical. In addition, it takes control, responsibility and accountability away from our students.

By not only including students in their "progress meetings", but having them as facilitators of their own meeting; students are empowered to talk meaningfully about their growth points and which goals they should set next. A template, like the one above, could be used to give meetings structure and provide markers for accountability.

Participants in this meeting (parents and teacher) act as coaches by asking how they might support this learning journey. Goals are jointly constructed as a "learning team" with each meeting participant responsible for various support roles.

These goals are made into copies that are displayed at student work stations, on the fridge, or even on a personal device. At subsequent meetings, fulfilment of the stakeholders' roles are discussed in conjunction with growth points.

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Photo of Clint Heitz
Team

Chantelle - If you'd be willing, I would greatly appreciate your support for Guideposts to Success by heading to the post and leaving a positive evaluation, as well as suggestions to grow the idea even more! Thank you!

Photo of John Faig
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We are in the early stages of piloting digital learning portfolios.  I'd love to help.

Photo of Lisa Yokana
Team

Agree with Donna. Get a team together and go to a Google Doc!

Photo of Donna Teuber
Team

Hi Chantelle, I agree with Lisa that this would make a great digital document. You have a lot of good information to get started with a Google Doc. Invite others to your team and jump in and create a document to start building out the concept. I look forward to seeing this develop!

Photo of Chantelle Morrison
Team

Thanks for the feedback, Donna!

Photo of Lisa Yokana
Team

Chantelle:
I like how simple your document is. It could be adopted to almost any age! If it was digital, it could be combined with digital portfolio, so that students could highlight areas of strengths and weaknesses.... 
How do students feel about filling this out? And have you seen any results? Would love to hear more about that....

Photo of Chantelle Morrison
Team

Hi Lisa,
Thanks for your feedback. I've definitely used this in a digital form (Google Docs). In the past, I've either met with students to fill it out together or had students fill it out and then conferenced before their progress meeting (sometimes the students don't notice patterns in their learning that I've identified so it's important to ensure they've addressed everything). Generally, students are pretty insightful about their own learning but sometimes they give "lip-service" and choose goals such as 'improve handwriting' because they enjoy handwriting. Also, prior to this, we've usually focused on SMART goals so that students feel confident to set goals that are achievable and not score-based. I find that students enjoy that there are no "surprises" about areas to improve in.