Spin the Wheel to Explore Your Passion w/Video

Students come up with ideas of challenging activities that they randomly sign up for by spinning a wheel. We ran 2 workshop, kids loved it.

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Acknowledgement: I can't thank enough our team members - Shane Booth, Carla España Lynch, Amol Desai, Chris Good, Ellen Deutscher, Karen Sorensen. They are so dedicated and supportive. Everyone contributed from different perspective and always encouraged and inspired each other. Quite often one initiated an idea and others gave feedback quickly and positively; very soon the original pieces evolved into big pictures that made perfect sense. 

Special acknowledgement shall go to my students who came to my test run workshops and helped me with video shooting and editing. They were so eager to learn new concept and tools. Sometime I was not sure and not so confident about the tasks giving to the students. But their interest and enthusiasm inspired me. They are great contributors to this project.

Especially Marlon, a 9th grader, who is a self-motivated and passionate team player, helped shot and edited the professional high quality video for my second workshop. After I submitted all the materials, he wrote me back: "I just read the full post and it's really nice. Thanks for having me!" That's the best award I got ever. 

Deck sharing link: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1KIdJg875AdFjdDFKhRAy8GTHoxrBj0O6mVCH1fspA48/edit?usp=sharing

Pitch Video: https://youtu.be/Ep5PZUstFN8

Video from 2nd Prototype workshop:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwjteAT_tx0

Mission:

Design an effective and fun way to help students find their passion; encourage more students to try all kinds of things to find their passion.

The Problem:

What is the current problem we are solving?

  • A lot of students, quite often even adults,  don’t know their passion, don’t even know how to find their passion. Tie back to original HMW around supporting students on college journeys… finding passion and real world meaning will motivate students and give them more purpose in school (and life)

How do we know it is a problem?

  •  A lot of people told us, and also from the survey when we ask “do you know your passion” at our design thinking workshop, over 90% students said no, quite often even adults.

Original idea: 

A lot of people, not only students, including adults even in their forties and fifties, do not  know what  their passion is, and don't know how to find it. In this case, one doesn't have to decide and just give it a chance, spin the wheel and take a dive into something new. The wheel can be filled with a range of developmentally appropriate activities, conceived by students. It may help you discover your true passion and calling.

Prototype Summary:

  1. “Spin the Wheel” Design Thinking Workshop/Class and curriculum development. Through this workshop/class, students will be introduced design thinking concept and method, then they will use it as a tool to design activities on the wheel, and finish the tasks picked by the wheel. We will teach students how to cheer for failure, how brainstorm and prototype, how to communicate and collaborate with team members. All those skills are critical to help one find his/her passion. We actually ran 2 prototype workshops; kids loved it and got into it quickly; students gave us a lot of experience and positive feedback.
  2. “Spin the Wheel” APP to help students lead the activities. It will serve as a game, social media and practice guide tool. Combined with offline events, it will help “spin the wheel” idea viral and adopted by more schools/teachers/students. We actually have 2 APP prototypes with user feedback.
  3. Combination of prototype I and prototype II; APP serves as a tool that teachers/students can use as a guideline, place to document and broadcast, finding more peers.

Prototype I - Test run of “Spin the Wheel” Design Thinking Workshop:

Workshop 1 on Feb. 16th, after introduced design thinking process and learned brainstorming and prototyping, students developed Wheel 1.0, which they can try tasks immediately, and they finished 4 tasks during the class; also Wheel 2.0, which students can try later outside home and school. Students really got into the idea and had a lot of fun designing the wheel. Their feedback is “I wish to try things on the big wheel.”

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Workshop 2 on Mar. 12th, students developed different kinds of wheels, for example, “how to choose elective” Wheel, “try new food” Wheel, etc. One boy said: Want to find your passion, come to this “spin the wheel” design thinking workshop; One girl said: this made her think out of box.

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What we learned from the workshop:

  • Students love to design the wheel; even designing process helped them think more about their passion
  • Design thinking is a great tool that students can use to design the wheel, and to finish task on the wheel
  •  Teamwork is the key; it is fun to try new things/challenges with a group people, not only yourself
  • After each workshop, we wish there were a place that we can spread out words, post photos and invite more peers

Prototype II -  App Wireframes and Mockups

Through brainstorming, the team was so excited about creating an app, we developed two different visions of mockups wireframes of how the app would work. We decided that the best way to figure out which elements of each one was to do usability testing.

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Prototype APP 1 and APP 2 mockups are here. Please click and take a moment to complete the two mockups of the apps so we can determine the best elements for the development process.  

We have received one high school student that reviewed both of the mockups, here is his user experience video viewing the two mockups. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0E13DnoBY1iRUppejZLX2VOUmM/view?usp=sharing

We are looking for more students to share how they would use the app.


Background: 

A lot of people, not only students, including adults even in their forties and fifties, do not  know what  their passion is, and don't know how to find it. In this case, one doesn't have to decide and just give it a chance, spin the wheel and take a dive into something new. The wheel can be filled with a range of developmentally appropriate activities, conceived by students. It may help you discover your true passion and calling. 

Update: in Feb, we tried this idea with a group of students. Kids learned design thinking and made two wheel via brainstorming. Wheel 1.0 list things kids can try immediately in house, and they were so excited and nervous but still finished 4 tasks on the wheel. Wheel 2.0 list things kids wanted to try outside home and school, such as "go to mideast and don't die", "make a company". From the feedback, kids loved this "spin a wheel" idea and especially high schoolers, one said "she wish to try task on Wheel 2.0". 

Update: on March 12, we tried Design Thinking Pop-up "Spin the Wheel" with 14 students and parents. It is definitely encouraging. All participates loved this idea, they worked in 3 groups and came up 4 different wheels with different focus/topic. Their feedback is very positive: one 9th grade girl said the process made her think out of the box; one 8th grade boy said "come to design thinking workshop to find your passion". We even had a students video crew to shoot the video and interview the participates. We will post the video ASAP. 

When I visited a local private school and found out they have "Wheel of Awesome" every Monday, students will try things picked by the wheel. And not surprise to find out that the school adopted Design thinking in their curriculum and classroom design. 


Have a doc or slides that you're collaborating in? Link it here.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iRd8kOcv_xNU_zN5OySAFhuYmTi4IOl9QzE57u7q9iE/edit#
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1KIdJg875AdFjdDFKhRAy8GTHoxrBj0O6mVCH1fspA48/edit?usp=sharing

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Photo of LiHsiang
Team

It's an excellent idea!!

Photo of Xin
Team

Thanks. Our students loved the idea and gave us a lot of feedback. 

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