Valid, legit and relevant research

For teachers who don't respond to the "shiny, new, trendy" approaches to PD, credible research might trigger new ideas to emerge.

Photo of Jennifer Gaspar- Santos
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Using stories can give teachers something to hang their hat on. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/brain-wise/201306/how-stories-can-permanently-change-behavior It allows teachers to trust that professional development is relevant, meaningful and there are credible sources that can defend it. 

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Photo of Charles Shryock, IV
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Have you seen Research, Real Research by Jessica Hadid ? Seems like you have a lot in common.  I also tagged you both in a post from LEE BOYES who has a cool but ambitious idea. To get Lee's idea off the ground, she would need some clear ways to measure the impact of any prototypes, to persuade administration. This would also meet your goal of involving teachers in producing their research... wouldn't it be cool if her idea was prototyped, implemented, and then we worked to get it published? 

Photo of Emma Scripps
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Jennifer Gaspar- Santos  This is awesome! It's basically like a much richer way to vet/ validate ideas. I wonder if the storycorps app or other existing podcast tools could help  with this. Or maybe this idea could even turn into something like "stories from" series - and teachers could listen to these stories as a way to get professionally developed. Lots of potential here. 

Photo of Charles Shryock, IV
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Nice idea!  You have identified a real sticking point for some educators, and therefore it holds a lot of promise. Some teachers mistrust research, having seen the pendulum swing a few times over the years, or having seen harmful practices justified by an incomplete understanding of existing research. But as education research gets better and better, I agree that we need to think about how it should inform professional development, and break down the walls that separate practitioners and researchers. 

Birdwalk:  I'm not sure if this fits into your idea, but I'm really inspired by how Gimnasio Campastre in Bogota, Columbia, has their students and teachers work together to publish a research journal.  (http://www.revistaelastrolabio.com/)  

Photo of Jennifer Gaspar- Santos
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I never heard of this idea of co-creation for research between teachers and students particularly on this scale --thanks so much for sharing it Charles. I'll pass it along to our librarians and faculty. 

Photo of Margaret Powers
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Thanks for your post Jennifer! Can you tell us more about how this idea would work? What would it look like if it was implemented in a school and how could it scale to other schools or districts?

Photo of Jennifer Gaspar- Santos
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I can see schools curating a library of educational research articles (perhaps ones written by the faculty themselves or from experts outside the school). Before PD, teachers will be asked to read one or two articles, contribute to an online conversation before the PD workshop, so everyone comes from a base line understanding of the topic. IN terms of scaling to other schools or districts, I think research skills are important for both students and teachers and when teachers seek out research to either validate or gain clarity on a particular topic or new educational approach, that they have refined research skills. For example, if the topic of PD was to explore flipped teaching. We can validate PD with brain-based research or present both arguments for and against flipped teaching in order to present a holistic view. This doesn't have to be large scale or a huge database, schools could use blendspace, a google doc, or even paddle, to curate a list of research articles.