The Open Source - Learning Source

Inspired by a mashup of "Wikipedia and "TeachersPayTeachers"models, what if PD was created by teachers and shared for free via a web portal.

Photo of Chris Good

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This is a spin-off idea from Brett B's post on a Teachers University

So what if there were an open source resource where teachers share Professional Learning experiences, information, videos, activities, research, etc...

Each resource would be posted, edited, revised, shared, manipulated, built upon, and maintained by a volunteer community of educators - and access would be completely free.

Tags could be applied to each resource to make searching for a highly specific piece of information easier - for example finding a K-5 appropriate approach to teaching "Computational Thinking" for English language learners - or something to that effect.

The site could also host regularly scheduled on-line chats with moderators to answer questions, or instead provide a video message board function where participants send pre-recorded questions to the community and received recorded responses in return.

A ranking system could also be applied that allows extremely relevant or impactfull learning experiences to stand out, or be sorted. 


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Photo of John Faig
Team

As a technologist, I love the idea of not reinventing the proverbial wheel.  We should also consider opening up the process for students to contribute their lesson plan ideas.  

Photo of Chris Good
Team

Love the idea of engaging students here - especially since peer teaching/learning can be so powerful. Why not create a tool where students can engage at a semi peer level with teachers and other students sharing their own best practices or ideas.

Photo of John Faig
Team

Chris Good  - Your post above calls for a tool to facilitate collaboration so the content does not go stale.   And, your post immediately above calls for a tool to facilitate student peer collaboration (and maybe working with teachers as mentors).  It sounds like we need a tool like TeachersGuild.org that can be extended to less sophisticated users.  I've used many other websites that collect educational content.  The curation is very helpful, but the community aspect is limited.  I'd love to grab some programmers and iterate a PD tool. 

Photo of Paul Kim
Team

Great Idea Chris!  Wondering if there are ways to get high volume participation and engagement...  Perhaps some element of social media or gamification or to have a parallel conference or meetups where people end up meeting to learning together.  Or perhaps people can upload video responses to exchange ideas in short clips or some adaptation of a Snapchat like scenario?

Photo of Chris Good
Team

Paul - meetups and snapchats would be an amazing way to drive traffic, visibility, and give this program a sense of timeliness and relevance! My fear is that without something like this (which would keep the community vibrant and active) it would otherwise become a graveyard of stale content.

Perhaps it could also function like - or make use of - reddit communities where ideas can continuously evolve - or spin off like subreddits etc....

Anything to create a sense of ephemera, urgency, FOMO, or excitement.

Photo of Kali Kurdy
Team

This open source idea resonates with me.  I have always thought that we should share good ideas with each other.  After all, we don't have the same students...so good ideas can benefit lots of students.  I wonder if you might get retired teachers to help with editing, coordinating, and distributing these good ideas?

Photo of Chris Good
Team

Incredible idea to inspire retired teachers to participate - not only to share their knowledge and perspective - but also to help manage and run a community for a community of professionals so often short on finding more time.

Photo of Lisa Yokana
Team

I've always thought this would be a good idea. When I first started teaching an AP course, there was a blog where you could ask questions about all kinds of things related to the course-from pacing to sharing lesson ideas, powerpoints and test questions. It helped me hugely. I think the key ingredient would be to get buy in from a huge amount of teachers and to have someone full-time to maintain the site, as you suggest. I know that others have tried this, but without someone to maintain the site, it dies. 

Photo of Chris Good
Team

I wonder if there is a way to "incentive-ize" participation - beyond the intrinsic reward of creating great content? Wikipedia somehow manages to inspire cult-like volunteer support, how might we do the same here?

Photo of Trever Reeh
Team

Have you seen: http://betterlesson.com just found it great for different activities in Common Core.