Maker Spaceteria

What if there was a maker space in the place where the time belonged to you?

Photo of Chris Andres
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Lunch is about the only time that is truly yours during the day. Why not take a minute to sit in on a "sesh" and learn how to solder? Or add LEDs to you backpack? Or create a representation/application of some big idea you have that was inspired by a discussion from an earlier class?

One obstacle for makers at school is time to make. Having a maker lab or space in or near the place where your ideas are flowing like oil and vinegar over a salad of greens grown in the school garden might be the spark a school needs to create and showcase ideas and promote collaboration. 

Oh, it's going to be messy alright, but in a 25 minute lunch period a person can eat in 10 minutes (I'm a teacher, I do this every day) and make in 15. After members of the school community have had some time to digest the morning lessons, lunchtime/free time with friends might be a great time to make an idea come to life or just become tangible by putting it to paper and posting for all the world to see. This Maker Spaceteria (let's not call it that) could be just a corner, in my vision, of an academic commons.

This week's menu might include: intro to basic hand tools, changing a tire, knots and whatnot, electric connections, not-so-electric connections, oh the possibilities! There would have to be some kind of gallery of imperfection begging for feedback where members of the community could contribute and collaborations can spark. 

OR

Put a Sammy-cart in the maker lab, so people could grab food and squat at a work station and get to making.

These ideas are still pretty cloudy.

let's get this bird in the air! Who's with me? "Yes, ands..." are encouraged.

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Photo of Kevin Jarrett
Team

Love this idea - combined with some easily portable materials in pre-packaged boxes for fast deployment and cleanup, this could transform the lunchroom experience in a very positive way. Easy, inexpensive, meaningful. Involve the students as design leaders, let them guide each other. Have different challenges appealing to different skill sets (code an Arduino; make a duct-tape wallet) with all needed materials packaged up and ready to go. Designate rotating kids as "master makers" and charge them with overall coordination of the space - setup, management, cleanup, inventory. Display creations on a "wall of fame" for all to see, encourage lots of photo-taking throughout. This could be great fun!

Photo of Catherine
Team

Maker mystery bags.  Put a bunch of stuff in a brown lunch bag and see what can be created with the supplies. The supplies in the bags could be duct tape, origami paper, conductive tape, LEDS, straws and batteries with LEDS.  Something along these lines would allow them to be creative and has minimal mess and cleanup.  They could even put their projects back in the "lunch" bags and work on them multiple days.  When completed put the completed project in the bag and have a drop off point so that projects could be displayed for inspiration for others.  And of course lots of photos.  The idea of having students being the keepers or masters so to speak is a great idea. This provides for ownership and encourages others to step up and take that responsibility.  This is an interesting concept and am interested in how its progresses.  This is similar to Kevin's Lunch Bunch. 

Photo of Chris Andres
Team

Thanks for your #feedup! I think there are a lot ways to give Ss access to materials and maker support. Are y'all able to join this idea team for the next phase? I'd love to collaborate further during the prototyping mode. Kevin Jarrett Catherine 

Photo of Catherine
Team

I am new to this but what the heck, I am willing to jump in and learn. Looking forward to this adventure. 

Photo of Chris Andres
Team

Awesome!

Photo of Kevin Jarrett
Team

Fantastic! Love this! When are you going to try it?

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