Hacktivity: Critical Conversations

When we talk about elevating the voice of all students and support them to feel civically powerful, it plays into how our classrooms support students to challenge, question, and get involved with one of the very first public institutions they are a part of - schools. Start critical conversations about how your classroom or school is supporting students to recognize and act on what matters most to them.

Develop a set of questions that feel relevant to your context. Make sure they get at how students are being supported to develop and share their unique voice in the school. Get a group of students and/or colleagues together to engage in the critical conversation. Set up norms. Explain what you are hoping to learn and how you want to channel insights into a plan.  Starter questions might be:

  • How is student voice supported at this school?
  • Which students typically exercise their voice? Who doesn’t?
  • Which students typically receive the most positive feedback? And the most negative feedback?
  • How might we better support students to share their perspectives about their classrooms and the school?
  • How inclusive is our environment? How might we build inclusive classrooms?

You can print off this Hacktivity here.  

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Once students begin to understand their own identity (ME) and are curious about other students' identities (YOU), they can contribute to US.

Once students begin to understand their own identity (ME) and are curious about other students' identities (YOU), they can contribute to US.

Photo of Nicole Ayala
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