Give students interesting and challenging problems to solve, and actively participate with your students in solving them.

You aren't really a part of your classroom's learning community if you don't take a break from directing and play along with the band.

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Many of my most successful classroom STEM experiences are ones where I give my students challenges and problems that I did not really know how to solve myself, or at least admitted that I may not know the best solution or only solution to. Joining my students in research, tinkering, trial and error, and eventually success gave them the OK to struggle and work through failures in part because they saw me doing the same thing. 

Please realize that this goes for all parts of STEM, including math! There are many times that I came ready with the "right" answer only to work with a group of students (and I mean 5th graders, not just older students) and have them figure out something better or even show me that I was incorrect. Tinkering with Math is just as important and powerful as tinkering with physical things.

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By and large, I think this is a phenomenal methodology! I adore the possibility of the workshop, Kris, to get different instructors feeling great. How might you bolster instructors who possibly don't approach a tinkering workshop? How might make an interpretation of this into a setting without those sorts of assets?

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Critical thinking aptitudes are vital in all everyday issues, and classroom critical thinking exercises can be an extraordinary method to prepare understudies prepared and to take care of genuine issues, all things considered, situations. Regardless of whether in school, work or in their social connections, the capacity to fundamentally examine an issue, outline every one of its components and after that set up a functional arrangement is a standout amongst the most profitable abilities one can procure throughout everyday life.

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Regardless of exceeding expectations in a scope of branches of knowledge, my energy is science. I cherish learning conceptual ideas and taking care of difficult issues. While at school I would like to pick up a more extensive and more profound comprehension of numerical ideas.

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Update: This idea is being built into a prototype! You can follow the Google Doc we are working on at the link below. Please add suggestions and comments here to help us progress. Thanks!
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ALx5gJSnuoE-rpFBag5iC8kq6xZEl6fCpbwTk85K8YI/edit?usp=sharing

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Overall, I think this is a fantastic approach! I love the idea of the workshop, Kris, to get other teachers feeling comfortable. How would you support teachers who maybe don't have access to a tinkering workshop? How would translate this into a setting without those kinds of resources?

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Chris Good The Exploratorium Tinkering course on Coursera that Trever mentioned below is a wonderful resource and can be done with few materials and tools.  There are some great books, such as Make:Tinkering which are intended for kids but are full of simple suggestions for tinkering activities which I believe will free the minds of teachers and encourage them to tinker with their students.

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love the co-learning aspect of this.

Photo of Trever Reeh
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Do you have any specific activities that you used with your students that would be good to use in this situation?

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Trever Reeh I generally give students opportunities to learn to properly and safely use the tools and processes available to them in our makerspace with a partially directed activity to build a project. I love projects like those from the Exploratorium Tinkering Lab - scribblebots, linkages, and others where kids use the same sets of materials and tools to build their own individual creations.
Once kids are familiar and comfortable with the tools and the space, we move to more open ended projects where they need to create something to solve a problem. Some examples of open-ended problems we have worked on are - "Create a modern item based on ancient Roman culture", or after reading the novel Hatchet, "Build a better hatchet to help you survive in the woods."

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I did the Exploratorium course on Coursera, thought it was amazing.

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Margaret Powers Many teachers need to be given an opportunity to solve problems and build things alongside their peers before they will feel comfortable doing so with their students. The image I used in this post is from a teacher workshop I conducted as a preview before their classes began coming into our makerspace. The teachers used the same tools and processes that their students would be given access to in a series of building projects.  They were encouraged to tinker, instead of following a standard set of steps, just as their students would be. The enjoyment and satisfaction helped them understand the opportunities for learning in such a setting, and began conversations between each other and the school's innovation staff that continued throughout the school year and resulted in new open ended STEM learning both in the makerspace and in classrooms throughout the school year.

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Using tinkering as a mindset/lens for all STEM work sounds great! Kris Swanson How could we help teachers become comfortable with this and start trying it? How can we help administrators value this and support teachers in trying it?