MARS Colonization & Roaming Rovers

Supporting student research, designing, and problem-solving for the real world race to colonize Mars for human life!

Photo of Angelique Moulton
8 6

Written by

MARS Roaming Rovers

“I think this project is also enhancing current STEM education and making STEM education real world applicable it is such a great point about the work you are doing!!!!! LOVING THIS!” -  Skyler Rossacci, SBISD

Headline:

Supporting student learning, the building, and problem-solving of the real world race to colonize Mars for human life!

Overview:

  • Students gain greater insight on the planet
  • Students will research the atmosphere and surface of Mars to discover challenges for human survival on the planet.
  • Students collaborate & problem-solve with peers to build a community of future Mars residents
  • Students will have opportunities to visit sites that house designers & builders of space rockets; they’ll participate in discussion and questioning sessions with experts

Next Steps:

  • actively learn from & communicate with experts currently working on the mission/path to Mars
  • Using the design thinking processes, students will create Rovers
  • access to field experts; astronauts; NASA workers; and other professionals currently working on missions to Mars (SpaceX)
  • participate in activities that prepare humans for a mission to Mars

Problem Statement:

We are actively preparing for missions to Mars but the generation most likely to get us there are in our classrooms now. Our gap is between those currently working on the missions and those who will physically colonize and live there.  

Image title



Image title
Prototypes


Evaluation results

5 evaluations so far

1. Do you love this idea?

Yes! I love this idea! - 100%

8 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Michelle Fontenot
Team

How exciting that you were able to connect your students with a NASA consultant! I would love to hear the whole conversation!

Photo of Angelique Moulton
Team

I can share but the whole discussion is around  nine minutes. The students asked the NASA expert some good questions. 

View all comments