Student home mentorship

Students can bring stem projects home to younger siblings and work with them.

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Students can bring opportunity to their younger siblings and learn more deeply by teaching them as a part of their project.

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Photo of Erin Quinn
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Stephen!!! I love the video!! You've explained so well why this concept is so needed in our world. I agree - we ARE going to need them!

Photo of Grace
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Fun idea! What about not just younger siblings, but the whole family? Families could have a lot of fun doing these sorts of activities, and it can really help parents and others understand how to talk about STEM and how to do STEM with their kids.

Photo of Margaret Powers
Team

This is a neat idea! Can you share some ideas or steps for getting started? How could you facilitate setting up this type of work/partnership at home? What about for students that don't have siblings? 

Photo of Stephen
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In addition to teaching, I work with an organization (Northern Central Valley Stem Center) that promotes STEM education.  I plan on suggesting working to get small stem kits produced with tiny home stem activities that could be done.  

Really, though, such things could be done as a home project for a class lab, flipping the classroom so a part of the assignment is replicating the findings of the class lab at home with a sibling.  

A perfect example is the candium lab.  All it involves is pouring m&m's from a cup and counting the number of candies face up vs face down.  A sibling would love to take part.  The teacher could have the student replicate the in class experiment, but send each kid home with a fun pack of skittles to repeat their findings and see if the graph is still curved.  They could have their sibling write a small conclusion to the experiment as evidence.

You question about students without siblings is a great point: 

Students who don't have siblings could teach the lesson to a young relative or an adult family member.  In the case of an adult family member it wouldn't be as helpful for a younger child, but the student still gets the benefit of the higher order thinking involved in teaching a lesson.

Photo of Margaret Powers
Team

This sounds like the start of a great plan! Do you want to copy these ideas to a Google Doc that you can link to your post so we can start adding more specifics about how to bring this idea to life?